The United Nations Week of Solidarity With The People Struggling Against Racism and Racial Discrimination

Standing Up Against Intolerance

We all know that racism, xenophobia and intolerance are issues prevalent in all societies. However, with each passing day, there is an opportunity for each one of us to stand up against racial prejudice and intolerant attitudes.

This week in Basingstoke here is how you can

JOIN US TO OBSERVE THE WEEK

21ST – 25TH MARCH 2021

We are very much aware that most schools and organisations are settling into new routines as lockdown is slowly lifted countrywide. In view of that, here are some suggestions on how you can join with us to observe the week:

  • Share the observances in your weekly newsletter, school boards and website
  • Explore the topics during an assembly or work meeting
  • Ask young people to write about a time they didn’t feel included
  • Raise awareness by sharing your pictures with us and on social media
  • Invite us to speak virtually

International Day For the Elimination of Racial Discrimination – 21st March

Theme: Youth standing up against racism

Background

The International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination is observed each year on the day the police in Sharpeville, South Africa, opened fire, killing 69 people at a peaceful demonstration against apartheid “pass laws” in 1960. In recent times since last year’s Black Lives Matter Movement, most youths and communities have engaged in peaceful protests because yet still, too many individuals and communities continue to suffer from the injustices and stigmatisations accompanied with racism. We can relate to these events and should keep challenging our societies to aim for better.

BY ENGAGING THE YOUTH IN OUR COMMUNITY WE CAN BEGIN TO EMPOWER THEM IN THE FIGHT AGAINST RACSIM AND DISCRIMINATION IN ALL FORMS

Remembrance Of The Victims of Slavery and The Transatlantic Slave Trade

Background

The transatlantic slave trade, which lasted over a 400-year period was the largest forced migration in history, and undeniably one of the most inhumane. According to the UN, from 1501 to 1830, four Africans crossed the Atlantic for every one European and 96 per cent of the captives from the African coasts arrived on cramped slave ships at ports in South America and the Caribbean Islands. Many of these descendants from the Caribbean Islands ended up here in the UK from the Windrush Generation. This legacy of migration is still evident today in the UK population. It is right we; REMEMBER THEM.


The United Nations General Assembly reiterates that all human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights and have the potential to contribute constructively to the development and well-being of their societies.

UN.org


CREDIT: We do not own copyright to these images and resources. They are for reference and educational purposes sourced from UN.org

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